what is a barcode label

In 1948 a guy by the name of Bernard Silver had an idea that he felt would revolutionize the grocery industry. He was inspired by a discussion that he over heard from the owners of a food chain. The owner wanted a way to automatically read product information during checkout. Silver came up with several ideas none of which worked out, nor answered the question of what is a barcode label.

Just as Silver felt that all was hopeless he was struck by inspiration thanks to morse code.  Silver had become obsessed with the form of communication. While on the beach of Florida he formed what some consider his first barcode label from the sand on the beach.

Silver was quoted as saying that he simply extended the dots and dashes to form narrow lines and wide lines. To read the lines he adapted technology from optical soundtracks in movies. This method had worked better than any previous attempts that he had made. However Silver still was not satisfied with his results. Deep inside he knew he could do better.

The world without knowing it was on the verge of finally knowing the answer to the question, what is a barcode label.

Silver finally developed a working model of his idea, and was issued a patent on October 1952. A friend of Silver who had helped work on the project by the name of Norman Joseph Woodland tried to pitch the concept to IBM. Eventually IBM decided to look into the idea and commissioned in-depth research. The research concluded that the concept was both feasible and interesting, but the processing of the information would require equipment that wasn’t readily available at that time. However IBM still offered to buy the patent, but its offer was not high enough. Philco (Philadelphia Storage Battery Company) purchased the patent in 1962 and then sold it to RCA later.

In 1966 the National Association of Food Chains held a meeting that would forever change the way we buy groceries. The meeting was to discuss the idea of automating the checkout systems. RCA initiated an internal project based on Silvers concept. The Kroger grocery chain of stores agreed to test it.

What Is A Barcode Label? Well IBM Is About To Tell The World

In 1971 IBM threw their hats back in the ring and started developing their own barcoding system. RCA failed at their attempts. They had problems with the barcodes smearing and not functioning properly.  It was IBM who eventually perfected the barcoding system. On April 3rd 1973 IBM’s version of the barcode was called UPC and was selected by the National Association of Food Chains as their standard.

Some Say That NCR Is The Ones That Answered The Question What Is A Barcode Label

NCR installed a testing system in a store called Marsh’s Supermarket in Troy, Ohio. On June, 26 1974,  a guy by the name of Clyde Dawson pulled a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit gum out of his basket and it was scanned by Sharon Buchanan at 8:01 am. History was made and that receipt is currently on display in the Smithsonian Institution.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.si.edu

You now know the answer to the question, What is a barcode label, right?

Tim BeachumBarcode LabelsAttempts,Barcode,Barcode Label,Barcode Labels,Battery Company,Bernard Silver,Checkout Systems,Code Silver,Dots And Dashes,Food Chain,Food Chains,Groceries,Grocery Chain,Grocery Industry,Hats,Init,Inspiration Thanks,Kroger Grocery,labels,Morse Code,Patent,Philco,Rca,Soundtracks,Storage Battery,Thre,Verge,What Is A Barcode Label,Working ModelIn 1948 a guy by the name of Bernard Silver had an idea that he felt would revolutionize the grocery industry. He was inspired by a discussion that he over heard from the owners of a food chain. The owner wanted a way to automatically read product information during...LABELRACK